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Pests in the Northeastern United States

Editors: W.T. Wilsey, C.R. Weeden, and A.M. Shelton

Wireworms
(Conoderus vespertinus)
- Life Cycle

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image of adult

by

UC - Davis

Adults:
The adult wireworms or "click beetles" are a yellowish brown color with a streamlined body tapering toward the rear. They have a joint at the thorax- abdomen giving them flexibility. The beetles are about 6-15 mm long. When on their back, they will Śclicką their abdomen on the ground to flip them in the air to right themselves, thus giving them their name, click beetle.

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image of adult

by

Iowa State University


Eggs:
The small white spherical eggs are deposited in the soil. Egg masses may contain 20-40 or more individual eggs. The eggs are about 0.5 mm in size. The female will lay between 200 to 1400 eggs.

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image of larvae

by

UC - Davis

Larvae:
The larvae have a slender, hard body about 3/4 to 1-1/2 inches (18-22 mm) in length. The chestnut brown larvae have many segments with 3 pairs of short legs near the head and have a notch at the end of the last segment. The larval stage can last from 3 to 7 years.

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image of larvae

by

University of Kentucky


Pupae:
The wireworm folds its legs on the underside of the body and pupates in the soil. The pupae is white to shiny brown in color and 12-15 mm in length.


Damage inflicted by wireworms


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Maintained by Jason D. Plate. Last updated Mar. 8th, 2007.